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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 2,947 (some duplicates have been removed)
garcia. kevin, washington post. the honorable rodney alexander, texas state senator. allison fitzgerald. skipping over the speaker for moment. bob carden with card in communications and the speaker committee member who organized today's lunch. i thank you. bobby patton. of thes leader and owner l.a. dodgers. the senior sector producer and manager of political programming for abc news. marilyn thompson, bureau chief for thompson reuters. a host and reporter with voice of russia and blogger for the washington post, she the people blog. rick dunham, a political reporter with the houston chronicle and former national press club president. [applause] it seems now like the whole country was watching when our guests today literally stood up for her belief on the floor of the texas state house. for 12 hours she filibustered of republican-sponsored abortion bill with turf -- on her feet without being able to sit, lead on her desk, or drink water. that made texas state senator, wendy davis, and he wrote to -- a hero to liberals and pro-choice activists. she began working after school when she was
press club. she talked about her future political plans and political climate in texas. funding education and women's healthcare. she filibustered an abortion bill for more than 10 hours. it eventually passed. it bans abortion after 20 weeks of pregnancy. this about one hour. >> good afternoon. welcome to the national arts club. the reporter for bloomberg news and the wondrous six president of the national press club. we are the leading organization for journalism. for more information about the national press club, please visit our website. , pleasee to programs visit press.org. i would like to welcome our speaker and those you view in our audience today. our head table and clues guess of our speakers -- includes guests of our speakers. members of the general public are also attending, it is not the silly evidence of a lack of objectivity. [applause] our lunches are featured on podcasts available on itunes. you can follow the action on #.tter today using asill ask as many questions time permits. now it is time to introduce our head against. please stand briefly. from your right
on "consider this." >> welcome back, we're talking about texas science textbooks and whether they should leave the door open to talk about flaws in evolution. kathy i want to go to you. we're talking about texas textbooks here. what is their broader influence, why should people in colorado or anywhere else care? >> there's a reason we said don't mess with textbooks, not don't mess with texas. that's because texas is the largest consumer of textbooks in the country and when you're in this business you want to sell as many texas books as possible. science perpetually books is paramount concern for many publishers and has happened for decades the books that are adopted here in texas then get pedaled around the rest of the cup because it's very expensive to change them. and folks don't even realize it but in california they figured it out and they introduced a bill that said they would ban texas textbooks, it got so bad, texas has such a bad representation of politicizing, experts in the subject matter to get what's right in the classrooms. >> our community has picked up about that point on politi
in textbooks. it's the question asked in texas so what does it mean for the rest of the nation? >> forget don't mess with texas. members of the scientific community have a different message for the lone start state. don't mess with evolution. texas is about to approve science textbooks that might be used for the next ten years. but there are questions about how evolution will be presented. the documentary the revisionaries details how in 2009 the state board of education adopted changes that some say opened the door for creationism or intelligent design. popular science guy bill nye has been unspoken about the teaching of creationism. here he is with big think. >> i say to the grownups, if you want to deny evolution and live in your -- in your world that's completely inconsistent with everything we've observed in the universe, that's fine. but don't make your kids do it. because we need them. we need scientifically literate voters and taxpayers for the future. we need engineers that can build stuff, solve problems. >> since its release last year that video last received about 6 million youtub
. delivered remarks at the future press club, her plans, and the filibuster she held against the texas abortion bill. the bill did eventually pass in july. this is just over an hour. [ gavel ] >> good afternoon. welcome to the national press club. i'm a is angela and reporter for the bloomberg news president of the national press club. we're committed to our future with our programming such as this while fostering a free press worldwide. for more information, please visit our website at www.press.org. offered too programs the public through a national institute, ournal visit press.org/institute. members, i our would like to welcome our speaker and those of you in the today.e the head table includes our journalists who are club members. if you hear applause in the members i'd note that of the club are attending so lack of just a journalistic objectivity. are features on our member-produced pod casts. the conversation #npclunch. using the i will ask as many questions as time permits. to introduce our head table guests. briefly as your name is announced. worthubesdorf, maria, ft. star
texas intermediate crude oil go up $6 per barrel in comparison to the week previous and gasoline futures went up $15. and so those are some pretty huge price jumps. we have seen the petroleum markets drop a little bit since then. there's a lot of concern and prices at the pump have been going up. on the other hand, things aren't as bad as they were a year ago. in fact, if people can remember labor day back in 2012, the national average is $3.83 per gallon. so, you know, it's a lot cheaper than a year ago but you can expect to see higher prices in the days ahead. >> michael, i appreciate it. have a great labor day weekend. michael green with aaa with us. stay tuned. more news in just a moment here on al-jazeera. saudi arabia for that. ♪ make >>> hello again, everyone, i'm tony harris. here is the latest from al-jazeera. president obama addressed the topic of military intervention in syria today. he says he has not made a final decision but the u.s. is considering a, quote, limited narrow act. the president made it clear he considered syria's use of chemical weapons a threat to national
at the national press club, they hosted wendy davis who held a filibuster in texas on a late-term filibuster. here is a look. you mentioned your feud with rick perry. are you thinking about running to succeed him? >> a lot of people are asking me that question lately. i am working very hard to decide what my next steps will be. i do think in texas people feel like we need a change from the very fractured, very partisan leadership we are seeing in our state government right now. a bid for another statewide office other than governor question mark perhaps u.s. senator or lieutenant governor? will run forthat i one of two offices, either my eat or thete ste governor. one more question. would you consider running as a vice residential candidates with hillary clinton? in answer to that i would say we will have to find out whether hillary is planning to run for president first. >> you can watch the rest of her comments at 6:25 p.m. eastern tonight. also in washington, the middle east institute hosted a discussion about the hub future of islam. in july the country's elected president was ousted by the mi
of texas in the last five years. roughly one million lost jobs in california. it is amazing. one of the points i made for writing a book on this, what we are seeing is one of the great wealth transfers in american history geographically from states like california that do not get it right, and my state, and states that do get it right, like texas. this is one reason to be bullish on the future of texas. one of the interesting things is texas does a much better job, in my opinion, of economically assimilating immigrants so they are successful here. california is more of a welfare state. it indoctrinates immigrants into the welfare system at a much higher pace than texas does. people come to texas for jobs. people go to california for welfare. you are seeing the differing economic outcomes as a result. texas is the model other states should be emulating. >> stephen moore from a recent discussion we covered. when you see some of those clips, the video portions, you can see them all in our video library. he was comparing jobs in california and texas. we will go to texas next. john, o
struggling economy. >> plus, voter id. there is another showdown, this one in texas. that's where eric holder's justice department is suing the lone star state again. next, the texas attorney general will respond and guess what. north carolina could be next. >>> checking some of your headlines right now, a senior white house official is saying there is, quote, very little doubt chemical weapons were used by the assad regime against civilians in syria. that coming as the administration weighs a potential military response. meanwhile, firecrews are rushing to save two groves of giant redwood trees from a giant wildfire in yosemite national park, clearing away dried brush and setting sprinklers. and police in florida trying to determine what lead a 72-year-old trucking employee to go on a shooting spree killing two men and injuring two others before turning the gun on himself. >>> from the unrest in egypt to more bombings in iraq and lebenon and the chemical weapon usa tack in syria that will now be investigated by the united nations. a lot of breaking developments in the mideast this morning. a
growth in texas. many have probably seen him on tv. it ordered member of the wall street journal, he writes about immigration, taxes, many things. i am sure you have read his articles. he has been an advocate for years, a scholar, and we are privileged to have you here, steve. thank you for coming. youthing you do well is look state-by-state a lot. you talk about growth and you look at the state and evidence. and what are growing role are immigrants playing in the country? >> first of all, when amity called me and asked me to come here to dallas to speak, i leapt amthe opportunity, because i an admirer of george w. bush. thank you for the invitation. thunder a little bit when you talk about four percent growth year it i would add to what you said, that i do not think we can accomplish four percent growth without immigration. it is a precondition to get to that higher growth rate. it may be too low. we are in the fourth leader -- year of non-recovery. there is no reason the economy cannot he recovering much faster than it is geared five, six, or seven percent growth. it is interesting
in west texas, some of the death and damage could have been mitigated. today for it to work, and facilities have to pay attention to the federal register. it is probably not too difficult. facilities that maintain the national associations, like the ones we will hear from later today, also have access to this information. it is unaffiliated with outliers that dot our nation's landscape of concern. many of these facilities operate in areas where the responders are volunteers do not have the access to specialized training that are necessary to respond to the explosions. i am troubled by the prospect of thousands or maybe tens of thousands of these facilities operated under the radar screen in there used to be a sense of urgency on this issue at all levels. it is essential between osha and dhs and the coast guard and state regulators and there has to be enough information available to identify those facilities that could pose a risk. that information needs to be shared. the next challenge is to ensure that dhs analyzes the facilities that provide information and gao has told us
was mentioning that he then added a second story to. >> sherry is watching us in arlington, texas, hi, jerry. >> caller: hello. thank you for taking my call. i have a question about sally and wonder if you could clarify the relationship george had with her that continued until after the revolutionary war. was she aware of that relationship? how did she deal with that? or was it something that was not discuss? >> you want to start? >> want to disagree. >> you disagree. >> this is a classic example of where unfortunately mrs. washington did her cause no good by burning all of those letters. in the late 1950s, two letters were discovered which the vents of reigning biographer, james thomas flexner made a great deal out of. some would say perhaps exaggerated. >> way too much -- >> -- their significance. sally fairfax was the wife of george william fairfax who was a neighbor and close friend. some people described him as washington's best friend. they lived just down river of -- from mt. vernon. clearly -- what i think clearly there was a -- i would use the word "infatuation." sally was an older,
approval before changing their voting laws. texas announced a voighte voter i.d. law? >>> the justice department sued texas over the law. why was the voting rights act passed? >> in response to a civil rights movement that said w the right to vote is fundamental in a democracy. it rectified acts of discrimination in which african/american were denied the right to vote and protect the rights. to on be able to participate effectively. pand you refer to act that required for southern states. >> take us into the present day. the. >> some sections are and don't want people to be denied to vote base based on race or any other kik characteristics. of section three, if there is a systematic, federal courts can fashion remedies. it is out moded because jim cr crowe with the temporary pro?rigz 1965 thankfully are no longer there. >> talk about sections 4 and 5. >> we are missing a lot. discrimination persists a texas jurisdiction. they are required to provide bilingual and had them at no polling places. said let's keep a galling referendum off the ballot & the large turn out of african/american
cooper. tonight a murder that's gone unsolved for more than half a century. a south texas beauty queen sexually assaulted, killed shortly after going to confession. suspicion turned to the priest but nothing stuck. police, though, they never gave up. so, now, 53 years later, evidence points only to the man who heard irene garza's final confession, the man they still suspect took her life. cnn's gary tuchman has the remarkable story. >> she had beautiful, shiny hair. she had this natural effervescence. >> she had the most musical type voice. >> she had a way with children, and she smelled like flowers. >> reporter: in 1960, irene garza was raped and murdered in mcallen, texas. >> one thing i remember is just screams. >> there was a suspect. who do you believe killed irene garza? >> father john bernard feit. >> father john feit. back then, a catholic priest. >> no evidence in this case right now points us in any other direction. >> so why is he still a free man? by all accounts, irene garza was a remarkable young woman. >> she kind of broke the mold. >> irene's younger cousin, noemi sigl
in the south. from texas up to maryland, we can use the public toilet. my high school class couldn't take picture on the capitol lawn of south carolina. we were away then from the american promise. >> reporter: it might have been given those circumstances, it might have been understandable if martin luther king preached retribution. but he did not do that. some members of the civil rights movement then criticized him for it. malcolm x refused to come to the march on washington. he called it the farce on washington. king, as we all know now was all about nonviolence. listen up. >> one of the things that my father was really trying to say not just 50 years ago but 50 years ago, 49, 48, 47, all the way, 45 when he was as isnated, he was really speaking to us about our humanity. and understanding our interconnectedness and interrelatedness. that is why he talked about sitting down at the table of brotherhood. in other words, us understanding that we are one huge human family. yes, there are a lot of different races but we are a human family. that is why he talked about not judging by the colo
and our tom traveled to texas, the home of the country' number one oil and gas-productiogas-producingstate. >> in the center of texas not so long ago this was a quiet farming and a cross road of the oil and gas home in south texas. that boom has opinion sunday night. >> there's an area where spanish is heard nearly as often as epbgish. >> translator: >> we've benefited quite a bit. we have a lot of oil companies that have helped us as well as other businesses. a will the of people are moving here from all over texas. >> reporter: it's been more than a century since texas saw their first oil gusher. with new hydraulic technology t drillers are exploring the deep shale as never before. texas doubles its crude production from two decades of falling output if it was considered an independent nation texas would rank the highest and kuwait and venezuela on the oil raising state. texas was able to escape the worst of the great recession while u.s. jobs grew by 1% in the last five years the oil an gas industry increase peud 40%. those paychecks are fourishing the local
in philadelphia pledging to focus first on texas within texas first, okay. apparently eric hold certificate apparent-- approaching voter rights protection like we his first day in prison. look, i'm going find the biggest-- there and beat the [bleep] out of him. i'm sending a message here. the other states will fall in line. (applause) but look, look, i've got to say what has texas done to deserve that? >> literally two hours after the court's ruling, texas official said they would begin enforcing a new voter requirement even though a federal court struck down the law because it quote imposes strict unforgiving burdens on the poor and racial minorities in texas. >> come on, texas. what were you doing for two whole hours? did it take you that long to make the call because your hand was shaking too much from the excitement of being able to disenfranchise voters? and let's be clear. texas is not alone in its rush to implement restrictive new voting laws. in a phrase that is almost never uttered in a flattering context, florida is also leading the way. >> florida can go ahead with the voter purg
the status quo. stories that matter to you. my name is ranjani chakraborty, i'm from houston, texas, and i'm an associate producer for america tonight. i grew up in a very large, loud indian family. they very much taught me how to have a voice, and from a very young age i loved writing, and i love being able to tell other people stories. the way to do good journalism is to really do your research, to know your story, to get the facts right, and to get to know the people involved in your story. america tonight and al jazeera america, it's a perfect place for that to happen. >>> a judge has let the jury go home early and deliberations will resume on freye in nidal hassan's court-martial. heidi joe castro has more from fort hood, texas. >> reporter: his silence didn't surprise anyone. the army major gave no closing argument. he said all along, he's the killer. >> it's exceedingly rare where you have the prosecution and the defense agreeing to the defense's guilt. >> reporter: chris jenks said the jury will find hassan guilty. the panel of 13 senior officers is now behind closed doors. they ar
as the leading country and how it fell apart. my name is jonathan betz. i'm from dallas, texas, and i'm an anchor for al jazeera america. >>my name is ranjani chakraborty, i'm from houston, texas. >>i'm kim bondy. >>nicole deford. >>and i'm from new orleans. >>san francisco, california. when i was a little kid, i just really loved the news. >>news was always important in my family. >>i knew as a kid that was exactly what i wanted to do. >>i learned to read by reading the newspaper with my great-grandfather every morning. >>and i love being able to tell other people stories. >>this is it, i want to be a part of this. >>this is what really drove me to al jazeera america. >> very much followed one of the two main camps. when they were aligned with the brotherhood and morsi, they kind of towed that line because they were against th. and like she said, they have no problem with a crackdown on the brotherhood by the military. and right now they really don't have leadership that is in the public sphere. they don't have someone who can speak on their behalf. they don't have someone who represents their o
republican fight over funding and the affordable care act continues in texas, with the state's junior senator, ted cruz, leading the charge against the expansion of health care coverage in this country. >> i am publicly committed along with a number of other senators that under no circumstances will i vote for any continuing resolution that funds even one penny of obama care. now, why is it that every reporter in the media and a significant percentage of republicans assume with an impasse that president obama will never, ever give up his principles, so republicans have to give up theirs? if you have an impasse, you want to know one side or the other has to blink. how do we win this fight? don't blink. >> the senior senator from texas disagrees with his junior senator. >> even if you shut down the government, mandatory spending would continue to pay for the implementation of obama care. we're all on the same side when it comes to the objective. there is some difference of opinion as to the viability, or the likelihood of success of this particular tactic. >> a new survey from usa today shows t
a filibuster that lasted 10 hours against the texas abortion bill. it eventually passed. you can see her marks live at 1:00 eastern. also live, the new jersey senate democratic primary debate. this election is being held to fill the seat of frank lautenberg. coverage courtesy of new jersey public television. 1:00, remarks from wendy davis from the national press club. until then, a discussion on the amount of money the pentagon spends on generals and admirals. host: we are joined by todd harrison at the center for strategic and budgetary assessments in washington. this is a subject that received scrutiny in washington following the fallout of the scandal involving david petraeus. it has come up again as the department of defense eyes and additional cuts. here's a headline -- are all these cuts going to come from the lower ranks, or do there need to be cuts at the top as well? is still to be determined how they will make these cuts. it is fair to say that the cuts will have to be proportionate, at the senior officer ranks will be cut in proportion to the junior ranks. the senior ranks have swol
every year the number one pick of all the law enforcement agencies within texas. their number one pick, all right? and i am a supporter of you -- you don't know it, but i am a supporter of you and a supporter of everyone in law enforcement. and i want you to do whatever is the proper thing. this lady did not -- i know in my heart, was not involved in intentionally walking out and stealing out $57. >> you don't know me, but i am the number one pick of law enforcement agencies. that seriously happened. that was texas's republican lieutenant governor, david dewhurst, on the phone, not doing anything, obviously, illegal, but throwing his weight around like a texas sumo wrestler, trying to wrangle some poor police sergeant in allen, texas, from releasing somebody from jail, a friend who had been jailed on shoplifting charges. the lieutenant governor, the number one pick of law enforcement, just wanted that police sergeant to do the proper thing, which should apparently be that he should take into account that any friend of texas' lieutenant governor must be innocent and, therefore must be r
. the department of justice by after the state of texas again. attorney general eric colder determined to allow voting nationwide without requiring identification. kansas secretary of state among our guests here tonight to say why the integrity of our electoral system must be preserved. and the end of the road is near for the self-proclaimed hugger. san diego mayor. and bradley manning wants to be called chelsea as it pursues taxpayer funded gender reassignment therapy from is leavenworth prison cell. the "a-team" takes up all that and a great deal more. we begin with another possible reason that the president's foreign policy is so incoherent and ineffective that members of his own administration seem uninformed. today state department news conference on syria and so-called red lines featured as a shocking contradiction from spokesperson jan psyche. take a lesson. >> the red line is the use of chemical weapons. that was crossed a couple of months ago. the president took action, which we talked at the time. lou: confident in her assessment that syria had already crossed that red line and that t
of the oil and gas boom. in the past few years, production has doubled in south texas. and job creation continues to rise. tom ackerman reports. >> it's midday in the once sleepy center of nixon, texas. not so long ago, this was a quiet farming town. now it's a literal crossroad of the oil and gas drilling boom in south texas. that has been again for the family restaurant run by dates e rojas. she has been drawn to an area where spanish is heard nearly as often as english. >> we have benefitted quite a bit because we have a lot of oil companies, and they have helped us, as well as other businesses in nixon. a lot of people are moving here from all over texas. >> it's been more than a sentence tree since texas saw its first oil gusher making america the world's leading producer until it was eclipsed by the middle east. but with new hydraulic fracturing technology, drillers are exploiting the state's deep shale oil and gas deposits as never before. >> in the past three years, texas has doubled crude production, a sharp referenceable from two decades of falling output. if it were considere
where many of ending up. >> i'm tom ackermann in texas where oil is help to go fuel america's economic recovery. >> we'll have all the action in sports. but should you be made aware if you are consuming them. that's next on "consider this." >> welcome back. britain will not back any military intervention in syria. germany has also ruled itself out, but france maybe willing to play a a role. the united states is not backing down ands it will continue to build international support for action in the country. >> protests are happening in egypt, despite government security forces closing masks and shutting off parts of cairo, supporters were urged to take to the streets. back to our top story, syria. i'm joined from syria. good to have you with us. what is your reaction to the no vote coming out of the u.k. parliament? >> well, we obviously are very pleased that parliament takes a stand on an issue like this. we have been calling for a very long time for political dialogue. we don't think that a military solution is at all possible in this conflict, and therefore, give more time for politi
colleague, ted poe, a cowboy boot-wearing conservative republican from texas could agree on, you would have said, not much. today we are partners in an issue, however, that makes sense regardless of your politics. ensuring sustainable equitable access of clean water for nearly 800 million women, men and children who don't have it and 2.5 billion without the most basic sanitation services. ted poe and i think that politics should stop with water. that's why today we're introducing the paul simon water for the world act of 2013. since congress passed the paul simon water for the poor act in 2005, the united states has become a global leader in efforts to increase access to clean water and sanitation, developing and implementing some of the most innovative approaches to help those in greatest need. we must not only maintain this progress but work to further refine and focus the efforts at usaid and the department of state by enacting the world act. we are committed because dirty water and lack of sanitation fects all areas of development assistance. especially the case when it comes to women a
why in a minute he's not just another whackadoo. live to dallas, texas, where ted cruz is about to speak in just a moment. see the big defund obama care banner which lets you know what the event is going to be like. also tonight the terrifying prospect that one result of the bankruptcy of the city of detroit could be the thousands of potential personal bankruptcies caused by the slashing of retirees' pensions. a full discussion on that is coming up. all that plus i am absolutely geeking out a little bit over what i think is the coolest car ever. the tesla. i will tell you why it's so cool but also why it's so important. >>> but tonight we begin with a man who i believe is the most dangerous politician on the american right. in october 2007 i sat in the media gallery of the united states supreme court and watched the solicitor general of texas argue on behalf of the state that he should have the ability to put to death a mexican national, jose, who had been convicted of raping and murdering two teenage girls in houston. he won that argument and he was executed by texas on august
to sue texas, saying it discriminates against minority voters. >>> the wildfire burning near yosemite national park has more than tripled in the last day, and the work to put it out is just getting started. ♪ >> there has been international outrage over yesterday's chemical weapons attack in syria. hundreds of residents were killed, victims, they say, of toxic nerve gas. and some first responders in syria died after treating victims. the aledged attack happened in a suburb of damascus. president obama has directed the intelligence community to gather information about the use of chemical weapons in syria. we want to warn you, some of the video we are about to show you is graphic, and we have selected images we thought were appropriate to air. >> reporter: a day after hundreds of syrians including women and children were killed or injured, a search among the dead for missing relatives. more than is 1300 people died after government forces used chemical weapons in a number of areas. an accusation strongly denied by the government. the french government demanding some sort of action. >
? >> reporter: well, i drove down north texas and i turned right up marigold and that was just a wall of smoke just thickening in the area and the streets were blocked off at the end of marigold closest to the freeway. there are two homes completely [ indiscernible ] heavy flames. there is a wall of flames in the air. right now they have ladder truck with the fire department [ inaudible ] water on the home but they're too far gone at this point. a lot of residents standing around watching. everyone is in shock. >> what agencies can you see helping out fairfield fire? i heard napa county is there? >> reporter: i haven't seen fairfield. cal fire is out here. i think i saw suisun. and then i heard something about trying to assemble a strike team. but that's all i've seen so far but there were some more setting up. there are apartments [ indiscernible ] when i first got on scene there was a wall of flames coming up the back of the apartment complex so i think they were setting up structure protection there. >> can you tell if people have been evacuated? >> you know, when i first got here, the ri
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 2,947 (some duplicates have been removed)